WORLD STDs PANDEMIC - ALL PERSONAL SERVICES WORKERS MUST HAVE MEDICAL CERTIFICATE TO WORK

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A PANDEMIC OF SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES (STDs) IS SWEEPING THE WORLDBRUCELLOSIS, SYPHILIS, GONORRHEA, CLAMIDIMITIS. THESE DISEASES ARE BEING USED AS A WEAPON OF MASS DESTRUCTION (WMD) BY ALIEN AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANISED CRIME GANGS AND NAZI FUNDRAISER TERRORISTS.

THESE STDs HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO COMPLETELY DECIMATE THE CRO MAGNON POPULATION ON EVERY CONTINENT.

In some countries, already as many as 90% of the population have any or all of the most serious STDs. Most are cross species infection, that is infections can be transmitted from farm animals to humans and vice versa.

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The following documentation and information has been provided by the Government of South Australia, Republic of Australia and New Zealand.

Brucella infection – including symptoms, treatment and prevention

This is a bacterial infection caused by a number of types of Brucella bacteria (Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, and B canis). The bacteria are usually found in the below and can cause illness in these animals.

cattle pigs goats sheep working dogs domestic animals.

B. abortus was successfully eradicated from cattle herds in Australia in 1989. B. melitensis and B. canis infections do not occur in Australia. Overseas travellers to areas where these infections are present may develop illness while overseas or on returning to Australia.

B. suis is found in some populations of feral pigs in Queensland and rarely spills over into domestic pigs. It remains a potential source of human infection in Australia.

Brucella infection is a notifiable condition1

How Brucella infection is spread

Brucella infection is mainly an occupational disease of farm workers, veterinarians and abattoir workers. The infection is spread by contact of breaks in the skin (open cuts or sores) with infected animal tissue or the ingestion of unpasteurised milk and dairy products from infected animals. The bacteria can also be inhaled in dusty animal enclosures, abattoirs and laboratories. Outbreaks can occur.
Signs and symptoms

Symptoms in humans include:

continuous or intermittent fever headache weakness profuse sweats chills joint pains aches weight loss.

The infection can affect the liver and spleen, and may last for days or months, and sometimes for a year or more if not treated.

Joint complications and involvement of the testes and epididymis (storage tubes for sperm that are on top of the testes) are common. Recovery is usual but relapses can occur. Death can occur from inflammation of the lining of the heart (endocarditis) but this is very rare.
Diagnosis

Diagnosis is made by growing Brucella bacteria from the blood, bone marrow or other infected body tissues or from discharges from infected body tissues. Blood tests are also used to make the diagnosis.
Incubation period

(time between becoming infected and developing symptoms)

Variable. Usually 5 to 60 days, occasionally several months.
Infectious period

(time during which an infected person can infect others)

There is no evidence of person-to-person spread.
Treatment

People with Brucella infection can be treated with a combination of antibiotics, usually for at least 6 weeks. If relapse occurs, 3 months of antibiotic treatment is needed.
Prevention

Exclusion from work is not necessary. A vaccine is not available for use in humans. Control is best achieved by eliminating the disease in animals. Avoid drinking raw or unpasteurised milk and products made from raw or unpasteurised milk. Educate farmers, abattoir workers and other occupational at risk groups on how to prevent infection when handling potentially infected animal products: cover open cuts and sores with dressings wear gloves, overalls and face masks when slaughtering animals or handling animal products thoroughly wash hands and arms after handling animals or their products take special care when handling animal birth products thoroughly clean all working areas

Useful links

Hand hygiene Keeping areas clean When you have a notifiable condition Milk – raw v’s pasteurised

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1 – In the Republic of Australia and New Zealand the law requires doctors and laboratories to report some infections or diseases to SA Health. These infections or diseases are commonly referred to as ‘notifiable conditions’.

When you have a notifiable condition

There are a number of infectious or communicable diseases that must be ‘notified’ by law to Australian and New Zealand Health. These infectious or communicable diseases are commonly referred to as ‘notifiable conditions’.

Why are some diseases notifiable?

The reporting of notifiable conditions enables Australian and New Zealand Health Departments to investigate, monitor and control the spread of these infectious diseases across the Australian and New Zealand Communities.

What diseases are notifiable?

There are around 70 diseases or conditions that must be notified. These include:

measles hepatitis A, B and C AIDS Australian bat lyssavirus invasive pneumococcal disease

To see if a disease is notifiable, refer to the Notifiable Conditions list (PDF 62KB) (opens in a new window).
What happens when I have a notifiable condition?

Doctors and medical laboratories are legally obliged under the South Australian Public Health Act 2011 to ‘notify’ or ‘inform’ SA Health about anyone who is either suspected of having, or who is confirmed as having a notifiable condition. This information is dealt with confidentially by SA Health’s Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB).

Doctors are encouraged to let you know that they will notify SA Health about your notifiable condition, and that as a result, CDCB may be in contact with you.
What information is collected?

If you are suspected or confirmed as having a notifiable condition, Australian and New Zealand Health Departments requires the following information:

your name, age, gender, residential address and contact details if you are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander the date you first became unwell your doctor’s name and contact details.

Additional information regarding vaccinations for the notifiable condition, potential sources of the infection or travel histories may also be collected if this information is relevant to the type of notifiable condition.

Will the Health Department contact me?

Yes, for some notifiable conditions, Health Department will contact you.

Why will the Health Department contact me?

The purpose of contacting you is usually to attempt to obtain information which may assist with:

identifying the source of infection identifying other people who may require treatment or information

What happens with my personal details?

Health Department staff cannot access data contained in the notification process unless they are involved in the data collection or investigation process. Also, notification data cannot be released to any persons not involved in data collection and investigation.

All information collected will be treated as private and confidential and notification data with personal details can only be secured by a court order.

Do I have to tell others if I contract a notifiable condition?

You do not have to tell others if you have become infected with a notifiable condition. However your doctor and the CDCB may advise you of exclusion periods from work, school, childcare or group activities. You are asked to observe those recommendations.

Does my partner need to be notified and tested?

Partners of individuals diagnosed with some sexually transmitted infections and blood borne viruses should be tested for infection. Your doctor or Sexual Health Centre will provide you with advice on confidential partner notification processes.

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